Prof Sarah Gilbert, Covid vaccine creator: Now let’s take on 12 more diseases

The old-school method of developing vaccines means you must go back to the raw materials and start from scratch for every vaccine you make. It is like starting with a bench of flour, sugar, eggs and butter. The next step is to take the offending virus, or other disease-causing microbes, and either kill it or weaken it to make a vaccine.

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Healthcare Professionals and the effects on their Mental Health, Health News, ET HealthWorld

By Ritika Aggarwal Mehta

The healthcare profession can be taxing on one’s mental health at the best of times, especially among those that have recently joined the profession. The decision making involved in a patient’s care knowing that they impact your patient’s life significantly, the expectations from patients and their families, and recently the ever-growing worry about patients or relatives becoming violent are just some of the reasons.

With that existing scenario, in came the new COVID-19 pandemic that posed an even higher demand from healthcare workers. The constant rise in number of cases and deaths, the initial lack of any specific treatment plans or vaccines, the closure of entire hospitals, the extensive global media coverage, increased workload, inadequate PPE, feeling unsupported, long working hours, fear of exposure to the virus and the risk of infecting loved ones, staying away from one’s support systems, and the stigma of being a healthcare worker were just some of the initial issues faced by healthcare workers. Working among these risk factors increases the risk of physical, emotional, and psychological distress.

Different research studies have been conducted around the world to learn the effects of the pandemic on healthcare workers. Reviews of these studies

View More Healthcare Professionals and the effects on their Mental Health, Health News, ET HealthWorld

Is Foundation of Primary care weakening?, Health News, ET HealthWorld

By Mevish P. Vaishnav & Himadri Bisht

Pharmacists and nurses are the foundation of primary care and the first responders for healthcare for an LMIC -India. Despite having a large workforce of nurses and pharmacists, both professions are facing an existential crisis. The first study conducted by Health Parliament for nursing made us to conclude that nursing was an endangered profession in India (https://bit.ly/3ly4Dm7), and the recently released study on pharmacist paint an equal gloomy picture of the pharmacist if not worse! Pharmacistis the third largest healthcare profession globallyand is the first port of callin case of a health crisis. Pharmacists are crucial in providing primary care to patients, but their role is limited to dispensing medicines in India. The pharmacy profession is facing a twin challenge. We have a shortage of pharmacists (considering the population size), and the potential of the current pharmacists is not being utilized completely. Even the vast network of pharmacies across rural and urban areas are underutilized, which could have been leveraged to provide primary care in the underserved areas.

In India, though, the number of pharmacists in the country recorded healthy gains, rising from 5,78,179 in 2006 to 9,08,523 in 2017. However, the density

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Made in India virus kits boost testing, and local industry, Health News, ET HealthWorld

As the first wave of the pandemic began to take hold in India, Sanchi Jawa and her 59-year-old father, Harish Jawa, realized that they had the symptoms of a COVID-19 infection. They decided to isolate and get tested – but this was no easy task during the spring of 2020.

The father and daughter had to make multiple calls to several private labs in the capital of New Delhi before they could arrange for the gold standard in COVID-19 testing – a real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction test, or RT-PCR.

It cost nearly $70 per test. A price Sanchi, 29, a digital marketer, and her father, a successful business owner, could afford but was out of reach for the majority of Indians, who have a per capita income of less than $160 per month, according to the World Bank.

“It (RT-PCR tests) should be accessible to the common man, and everybody should be able to get it done,” Sanchi said.

Over a year later, most Indians can access PCR tests at a fraction of the cost – due to a large-scale public-private partnership, known as InDx, that set up the local know-how and infrastructure to manufacture these tests within India.

View More Made in India virus kits boost testing, and local industry, Health News, ET HealthWorld